In photos: A day camp with its sights set on tomorrow

Through initiatives like Camp Amazon, the company is inspiring the next generation of pioneers to experience firsthand the wonders of STEM.
on December 18, 2018

For a three-hour stretch in July, Amazon’s BFI3 fulfillment center in DuPont, Washington, looked and sounded a bit different from a typical day.

As you would expect, there were thousands of talented and dedicated associates working in tandem with robots to efficiently expedite customer orders—nothing unusual there. But there was also something else, something teeming with youthful curiosity and giddy excitement within the walls of the state-of-the-art distribution facility.

That “something” was a group of young, creative spirits and curious minds well-positioned to become the innovators of the future. That “something” was a group of wide-eyed, eager-to-learn kids.

On that summer day, Amazon welcomed approximately 60 children between the ages of 8 and 12 to Camp Amazon, the company’s first fulfillment center-based camp that gives students a chance to see STEM (science, technology, engineering, and math) in action and offers them an up-close look at how creative thinking is critical to Amazon Operations.

This event in DuPont, as well as programs like Amazon’s A to Z Experience (a STEM camp that invites students behind the scenes for a day of learning and inventing) and Amazon Future Engineer (a program that aims to expand educational opportunities from kindergarten through college, especially to young girls, underrepresented minorities, and those in underserved and low-income communities), are representative of initiatives, contributions, and programs taking place in communities across the country as part of Amazon’s commitment to STEM and, more broadly, to today’s young people who will become the thought leaders of tomorrow.

Students participate in a Camp Amazon event at a fulfillment center in Washington

On July 28, 2018, Amazon took its investment in STEM education and robotics to the next level with Camp Amazon, a robotics and STEM day camp at its BFI3 fulfillment center in DuPont, Washington.
Photo By AMAZON FULFILLMENT
Young students at Camp Amazon event at the BFI3 fulfillment center

Approximately 60 children between the ages of 8 and 12 were invited to this three-hour immersion experience that encouraged them to build, imagine, and innovate.
Photo By AMAZON FULFILLMENT
Students participate in a Camp Amazon event at a fulfillment center in Washington

Participating groups included the families of BFI3 associates, local school groups interested in STEM, and two high school robotics teams from neighboring cities.
Photo By AMAZON FULFILLMENT
Students participate in a Camp Amazon event at a fulfillment center in Washington

Members of the high school robotics teams acted as mentors for the younger kids at Camp Amazon, leading them in hands-on activities to introduce them to the STEM concepts that fuel each of Amazon’s innovative fulfillment centers.
Photo By AMAZON FULFILLMENT
Young students at Camp Amazon event at the BFI3 fulfillment center

Campers were divided into three groups and worked their way through several different 40-minute STEM/robotics stations tailored to their age group.
Photo By AMAZON FULFILLMENT
Students participate in a Camp Amazon event at a fulfillment center in Washington

Students participated in a guided tour of BFI3 to witness how Amazon uses robotics and STEM in everyday operations.
Photo By AMAZON FULFILLMENT
Young students at Camp Amazon event at the BFI3 fulfillment center

To their delight, campers had the opportunity to work in teams to build a replica of the DuPont facility’s most popular orange bot.
Photo By AMAZON FULFILLMENT
Students participate in a Camp Amazon event at a fulfillment center in Washington

They also put their puzzle skills to the test in a “Tetris”-like truck-packing game.
Photo By AMAZON FULFILLMENT
Students participate in a Camp Amazon event at a fulfillment center in Washington

Amazon recognizes that the jobs of tomorrow require a strong aptitude for science, technology, engineering, and math. That’s why the company supports STEM education programs to better prepare students for future in-demand jobs.
Photo By AMAZON FULFILLMENT
Students participate in a Camp Amazon event at a fulfillment center in Washington

The company is especially invested in initiatives aimed to help young girls and students from underprivileged and underrepresented communities reach their full potential in the digital age.
Photo By AMAZON FULFILLMENT
Students participate in a Camp Amazon event at a fulfillment center in Washington

Throughout these programs, Amazon encourages children to build, imagine, and innovate. Through Camp Amazon, the company aims to provide young people in the local community with the tools and connections they need to make that possible.
Photo By AMAZON FULFILLMENT
Teacher and student work on a robot during a Camp Amazon event

Mentorship is key to making sure kids don’t just get excited about STEM and robotics, but that they have the opportunity to keep pursuing those interests well into the future. Partnering with local organizations like FIRST Washington and Washington STEM helps make those connections possible.
Photo By AMAZON FULFILLMENT
Amazon employees prepare for Camp Amazon event at the BFI3 fulfillment center

At the conclusion of the DuPont event, Amazon was thrilled to provide donations of $2,000 to each of the high school teams mentoring the kids at Camp Amazon, the SOTAbots and the Olympia Robotics Federation (ORF). These donations (totaling $4,000) will support the teams’ STEM and robotics programs. Clubs like these ensure children in local communities have the opportunity to pursue their interests in STEM.
Photo By AMAZON FULFILLMENT
Students participate in a Camp Amazon event at a fulfillment center in Washington

To date, Amazon has already committed more than $60 million to STEM efforts, and it will continue to identify ways to support and foster the next generation of innovators in communities across the country.
Photo By AMAZON FULFILLMENT
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